sprkfv.net

summary #4EDITORIAL
-
A Word from the Editor

FROM THE ARCHIVE
- Individual Tournament
(Serge Prokofiev)

FEATURE: Trapèze
- Trapèze: a Forgotten Ballet by Serge Prokofiev and Boris Romanov
(Noëlle Mann)

ARTICLES
- Sergei Prokofiev – “Soviet” Composer
(Ekaterina Chernysheva)
- The Magnificent George
(Lesley-Anne Sayers)

A PHOTO - A STORY

ARTISTS ON PROKOFIEV’S MUSIC
-
The Many Faces of Prokofiev
(Barbara Nissman)

REVIEWS
-
Eisenstein: the Sound Years
(John Riley)
- CD Reviews (David Nice and Daniel Jaffé)

PUBLICATION
- Serge Prokofiev Diary 1907-1933

TrapèzeA forgotten balletby Serge Prokofiev and Boris Romanov


Noelle MANN

Trapマze (photo)

Serge Prokofiev signature
Boris Romanov signature

Trapèze is the only work by Prokofiev whose creation remains an obscure event in an otherwise famous career. Though the reasons for this are many, they are mostly a result of the ballet’s protracted genesis, its few and unsuccessful performances, and of Prokofiev’s habit of reworking his stage music – ballet, opera, theatre and film – into concert pieces. Most references to Trapèze in Russian or Western literature – these are few and poorly documented – offer a confused and hazy picture of the circumstances surrounding the ballet. Essential questions, therefore, have remained unanswered: what were the ballet’s original scenario and choreography; when and where was it performed; and why did it altogether disappear from the repertoire? Very little is known about the Russian Romantic Theatre and its artistic director, Boris Romanov. What was Romanov’s relationship with the composer? Prokofiev’s Quintet Op.39 was born out of the music for Trapèze but in the absence of the ballet’s original music it has so far been unclear whether the Quintet represents the actual ballet music or a revision of it. The same applies to the later Divertimento Op.39 which includes some of the Trapèze music.
   The recent discovery at the Serge Prokofiev Archive of hitherto unknown documents (music manuscripts, correspondence and diaries), and a two-year long investigation allow us to throw some light on the circumstances surrounding this work, and have made possible a reconstruction of its music.   
Next