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number four      november 2002


EDITOR
NoŽlle Mann
REVIEWS EDITOR
David Nice
TRANSLATIONS
Edward Morgan
LAYOUT
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OTHER ISSUES

 

UPDATE: 20170111

Summary

Editorial

EDITORIAL
- A Word from the Editor

FROM THE ARCHIVE
- Individual Tournament (Serge Prokofiev)

FEATURE: TrapŤze
-
TrapŤze: a Forgotten Ballet by Serge Prokofiev and Boris Romanov (NoŽlle Mann)

ARTICLES
- Sergei Prokofiev – “Soviet” Composer
(Ekaterina Chernysheva)
- The Magnificent George (Lesley-Anne Sayers)

A PHOTO - A STORY

ARTISTS ON PROKOFIEV’S MUSIC
-
The Many Faces of Prokofiev (Barbara Nissman)

REVIEWS
-
Eisenstein: the Sound Years (John Riley)
- CD Reviews (David Nice and Daniel Jaffť)

PUBLICATION
- Serge Prokofiev Diary 1907-1933

This issue, the last before the Special Anniversary Issue that will mark 50 years after Prokofiev’s death, offers articles and news of particular interest, and hitherto unknown photos from the Prokofiev Estate and Lina Prokofiev’s private collection at the Archive.
   The Feature is a long-awaited article that throws light for the first time on the least known and partly lost work by Prokofiev, the ballet TrapŤze. Based exclusively on recently discovered primary documentation, it explains how the ballet came to be forgotten after too short a life, and reveals how it can now be prepared for performance and staging as part of the Prokofiev 2003 events.
   Another two articles focus on the two main periods of Prokofiev’s life. An in-depth review of the artistic partnership between designer Georgi Iakulov and Prokofiev over the ballet Le Pas d’Acier (contemporary with TrapŤze) includes unique images from Iakulov’s own Archive in Erevan, Armenia. The now established “Russian view” of Prokofiev’s significance concentrates on his artistic contribution, and misfortunes, as a Soviet composer. Readers will enjoy the thoughts of pianist Barbara Nissman who reviews Prokofiev’s piano concerti and shares with us her personal feelings about these works.
   Finally and most importantly, Sviatoslav Prokofiev introduces the Serge Prokofiev Diary. A private publication from the Serge Prokofiev Estate, this amazing document (in Russian) spans 26 years of Prokofiev’s daily life (1907–1933), opening up the composer’s experiences and private thoughts during some of the most critical years of his life. Prokofiev is one of the twentieth-century composers who has most suffered from factual inaccuracy in Western literature. The Diary, which often includes daily entries, will become an invaluable source of reliable information for future research and publications. It also makes fascinating and entertaining reading!

NoŽlle MANN, Editor of Three Oranges